Articles Tagged with “John Elliott Leighton”

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Once again a tourist lured by the thrill of parasailing has ended a ride in the hospital.  This time it was an American woman who was parasailing while on vacation in Mexico. Katie Malone was visiting Puerto Vallarta for her birthday last month when she went parasailing. A model in San Diego, Ms. Malone was suspended in the air when the tow line broke, leaving her floating untethered in the air for about 45 minutes. As ABC News reports, she eventually crash landed and suffered multiple injuries, including a fractured pelvis, skull and ribs, a collapsed lung and facial injuries. She also sustained head injuries that required her being evacuated back to California.

This incident is one of many which have plagued the parasailing industry for years.  Virtually unregulated, someone parasailing can meet a terrible fate any number of ways.  The loss of control from the tow rope is among the worst,a s the parasailor can catapult at high speed into buildings and fixed objects.  Those who land in the water can drown while strapped into the harness or get caught in the parachute.

Following the case involving the tragic parasailing death of Amber May White and injury to her sister Crystal off the coast of Pompano Beach, Florida, Leighton Law’s John Elliott Leighton brought suit against the parasailing company and resort which arranged the amusement.  After successfully recovering for the family, Leighton and Amber’s mother Shannon Kraus fought for passage of the nation’s first parasailing safety law, the White-Miskell Act.  Leighton has lectured and published articles on parasailing and resort safety and continues to fight for strong safety laws for tourists.

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Almost 31,000 people end up in the emergency room from injuries suffered at amusement parks and theme parks. Many are minor, some are catastrophic.  But one thing they have in common…no federal regulation.

The federal Consumer Product Safety Commission only oversees mobile amusements such as carnivals.  That means that fixed-site or permanent amusements (like Disney, Six Flags, Busch Gardens, Universal) are inspected or regulated by the states, if they so choose.  And in any manner the state chooses.

With the pull back of safety regulations by the government, it is expected that there will be more incidents causing more injuries.  Summer is the most active time at amusement parks, filled with out-of-school children and vacationers trying to take in some fun.  Many states regulate and inspect amusement parks, but at least six (Alabama, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah) have no regulation at all. And in one case in Texas, operator Six Flags was in charge of investigating its own accident which caused the death of a woman.

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Cruise Lines Finally Start Using Lifeguards…After Many Deaths and Injuries

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Cruise ships have seen many drownings and near-drownings of children in recent years. Virtually none of the major cruise lines would place lifeguards on their ships…until now.

According to The Miami Herald and New Times, Royal Caribbean, Disney and Norwegian Cruise Lines have installed lifeguards on most of its ships.  This is in response to at least a dozen drownings or catastrophic pool accidents in cruise ship pools in the past few years.

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Shannon Kraus is a mother on a mission. Seven years after the death of her 15 year-old daughter and a brain injury to her 17 year-old, Shannon has succeeded in getting some measure of parasailing regulation passed in Florida.

Working with her attorney, John Leighton of Leighton Law, P.A., and countless hours of meetings with state and local legislators, plus continued parasailing injuries and deaths each year, the Florida Legislature finally passed a law to regulate parasailing safety:

http://www.actionhub.com/news/2014/06/24/florida-governor-signs-parasailing-bill-law/

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In what can only be characterized as a repeat tragedy in South Florida, 28 year-old Kathleen Miskell of Connecticut was killed while riding a parasail off the coast of Pompano Beach, Florida yesterday. While her husband watched helplessly from the tandem parasail in which they were strapped, the harness holding Kathleen failed, throwing her 200 feet to the water. Ms. Miskell was pronounced dead at North Broward Medical Center a short time later.

This tragic death falls almost on the anniversary of the double tragedy involving 15 year-old Amber May White and her 16 year-old sister Crystal in 2007. Amber May was killed and Crystal suffered a severe head injury when the parasail on which they were riding disconnected from its line, throwing them into a building. This too occurred in Pompano Beach.

Mrs. Miskell died while aboard a Wave Blast Water Sports parasailing operation. The ride was operated out of the Sands Hotel in Pompano Beach. This took place by the Hillsboro Inlet.