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Parasailing Disaster Sheds New Light On Old Parasailing Safety Problem

Once again a tourist lured by the thrill of parasailing has ended a ride in the hospital.  This time it was an American woman who was parasailing while on vacation in Mexico. Katie Malone was visiting Puerto Vallarta for her birthday last month when she went parasailing. A model in San Diego, Ms. Malone was suspended in the air when the tow line broke, leaving her floating untethered in the air for about 45 minutes. As ABC News reports, she eventually crash landed and suffered multiple injuries, including a fractured pelvis, skull and ribs, a collapsed lung and facial injuries. She also sustained head injuries that required her being evacuated back to California.

This incident is one of many which have plagued the parasailing industry for years.  Virtually unregulated, someone parasailing can meet a terrible fate any number of ways.  The loss of control from the tow rope is among the worst,a s the parasailor can catapult at high speed into buildings and fixed objects.  Those who land in the water can drown while strapped into the harness or get caught in the parachute.

Following the case involving the tragic parasailing death of Amber May White and injury to her sister Crystal off the coast of Pompano Beach, Florida, Leighton Law’s John Elliott Leighton brought suit against the parasailing company and resort which arranged the amusement.  After successfully recovering for the family, Leighton and Amber’s mother Shannon Kraus fought for passage of the nation’s first parasailing safety law, the White-Miskell Act.  Leighton has lectured and published articles on parasailing and resort safety and continues to fight for strong safety laws for tourists.